Winter Greens with Garlicky Vinaigrette

Winter greens have a ton of peppery flavor. We paired them with a garlicky Caesar-inspired dressing that you can make with or without anchovies.

Winter Greens Salad with Garlicky Vinaigrette Recipe

Winter Greens with Garlicky Vinaigrette Recipe

Total Time: 25 min.
Prep Time: 15 min.
Cooking Time: None
Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients:
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup fresh lemon juice
3 anchovy fillets, rinsed, finely chopped (optional)
1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
Sea salt (or Himalayan salt) and ground black pepper (to taste; optional)
4 cups coarsely chopped (or torn) radicchio
8 cups coarsely chopped (or torn) mixed bitter winter salad greens (like chicory and escarole)
2 medium endive heads, sliced in half lengthwise, then crosswise in ½-inch slices

Preparation:
1. Rub garlic in the bottom of a medium salad bowl.
2. Add lemon juice and anchovy; mix well.
3. Slowly add oil while whisking constantly; mix well. Season with salt and pepper if desired. Set aside for 10 minutes.
4. Place radicchio, salad greens, and endive in salad bowl; mix well. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Facts (per Serving):
Calories: 111
Fat: 4 g
Carbohydrates: 15 g (Fiber: 11 g; Sugars: 2 g)
Protein: 6 g

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Maple Pecan Protein Shake

Looking for something sweet, but still healthy? Try this nutty shake sweetened with maple syrup.

Maple Pecan Protein Shake Recipe

Maple Pecan Protein Shake Recipe

Total Time: 5 min.
Prep Time: 5 min.
Cooking Time: None
Yield: 1 serving

Ingredients:
1 cup unsweetened almond milk
1 scoop Vanilla Shakeology (or sub your favorite protein powder)
1 Tbsp. coarsely chopped raw pecans
1 Tbsp. coarsely chopped raw cashews
1 tsp. pure maple syrup
1 cup ice

Preparation:
Place almond milk, Shakeology, pecans, cashews, maple syrup, and ice in blender; cover. Blend until smooth.

Nutrition Facts (per Serving):
Calories: 161
Fat: 12 g
Carbohydrates: 12 g (Fiber: 3 g; Sugars: 8 g)
Protein: 4 g

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Sweet Potato Salad

This salad is topped with hearty sweet potatoes. They’re a superfood high in beta-carotene, potassium, and manganese. Pumpkin seeds add extra crunch!

Sweet Potato Salad Recipe

Sweet Potato Salad

Total Time: 1 hour 15 min.
Prep Time: 15 min.
Cooking Time: 30 min.
Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients:
1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1½ tsp. red wine vinegar
1 tsp. fresh lemon juice
½ tsp. raw honey (or pure maple syrup)
1 dash Himalayan salt (or sea salt)
1 tsp. chopped fresh herbs (like basil, oregano or parsley) (to taste; optional)
1 medium baked sweet potato, peeled and cut into ½-inch cubes
1 medium green apple, diced
½ medium red bell pepper, diced
1 stalk green onion, finely sliced
2 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh cilantro
4 cups fresh arugula
2 Tbsp. pumpkin seed kernels, toasted (or chopped raw walnuts)

Preparation:
1. Combine oil, vinegar, lemon juice, honey, salt, and herbs (if desired) in a medium bowl; whisk to blend.
Set aside.
2. Combine sweet potato, apple, bell pepper, onion, and cilantro in a large bowl; mix well.
3. Drizzle dressing over sweet potato mixture; toss gently to blend.
4. Place even amounts of arugula on two serving plates; top each with sweet potato mixture and sprinkle with pumpkin seeds.

Tip: Bake fork-pierced sweet potato at 450° F for 30 to 40 minutes or until just tender. Do not over bake; cool.

Nutritional Information (per serving):
Calories: 236
Total Fat: 11 g
Total Carbs: 32 g (Fiber: 6 g; Sugar: 16 g)
Protein: 5 g

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5 Tips to Get Your Kids to Eat Healthy

As hard as it is to fight your junk food urges, if you have kiddo, you probably know that getting Junior to make smart food choices is triple the challenge. It’d be excellent if you could just yell, “Hey, you! Eat your spinach!” But you can’t. As is the case when dealing with most aspects of a child’s life, it takes commitment, patience, and some serious cunning to steer them down the right path. Here are 5 tips to help you in your family’s healthy eating journey!

5 Tips for Getting Kids to Eat Healthy.png

5 Tips to Get Your Kids to Eat Healthy

1. Portion control.

Digging into the entire box of goldfish crackers, or any other kid’s snack, is a bad idea. So it’s a good idea to empty out that box into smaller ziplock bags, for better portion control. Do this the moment the treats are pulled from the grocery store bags! This helps children understand what a healthy portion looks like. Meals and portion sizes have increased nearly 40 percent over the last decade. As parents, you have the opportunity to teach children that smaller portions are not deprivation—it’s proper nutrition.

2. Sneak in the whole grains.

Use whole-grain pasta and brown rice, but don’t tell your kids. They’ll never know the difference. No one, especially children, likes change when it comes to food. I like to use the “stealth” approach for any change, i.e., fly low under the radar! When first switching kids from regular pasta to whole-grain, whole wheat pasta, try it in stages. First, add just a 1/4 cup of the healthier noodles. Each time add more, until eventually they are eating the whole-grain stuff and have no idea! The key is making the changes gradually and not making a big deal about them.

3. Lead by example.

If you’re giving your kids apples but you’re eating Snickers, it’s never going to work. Following a healthy diet needs to be part of the commitment of good parenting. Never use the “D” [“Diet”] word in front of children. When you do, and they see you eating healthily, they assume that healthy food is something you’re forced to eat as a punishment. Lead by example. Say, “Mommy is eating this for more energy and to be stronger.” Use positive comments about healthy food without reference to weight. Try, “I feel so much stronger when I eat fruit for a snack!”

4. Make food fun.

Taste is something that changes over time. Our taste buds actually change as we age; this explains why some children will eat broccoli and green beans and others find the smell and taste worse than starvation! Continually introduce healthy food and find unique ways to introduce the food in stages. For example, your children might try a small amount of broccoli mixed in with their mac and cheese. Once you’ve gotten them to accept that as a regular staple, transition to broccoli with a creamy cheese soup. Eventually, your children may acquire a taste for steamed broccoli! Can you imagine the day? But starting right out of the gates with a big plate of steamed broccoli in front of a child who doesn’t eat green things is asking for a battle! Baby steps!

5. Don’t pressure kids to eat.

Present the food, but don’t force kids to eat it. Making demands will just polarize your kids, while letting them eat healthy foods on their own terms leads to healthy habits. If your first attempt doesn’t work, don’t take it personally or assume that this is a life-or-death situation. Take a deep breath, let it go, and try it again another day—try serving those healthy foods prepared in new ways. It often takes several times before your child will decide to try something new. Oh, and I’ve heard my parent friends mention that their children will often try new food with their grandparents or at their friends’ houses, foods that they won’t try with them! Ask what new foods they tried and then offer to prepare them, and get excited about their willingness to try new foods.

Oatmeal with Cardamom and Cranberries

The spicy-sweet flavor and aroma of cardamom pairs perfectly with tart cranberries in this oatmeal. Raw honey and almond milk add even more rich flavor.

Oatmeal with Cardamom and Cranberries Healthy Breakfast Recipe

Oatmeal with Cardamom & Cranberries Recipe

Total Time: 10 min.
Prep Time: 5 min.
Cooking Time: 5 min.
Yield: 4 servings, about ½ cup each

Ingredients:
2 cups water
2 Tbsp. unsweetened dried cranberries
¼ tsp. sea salt (or Himalayan salt)
1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
½ tsp. ground cardamom (or ground cinnamon)
1 tsp. raw honey (optional)
1 cup unsweetened almond milk

Preparation:
1. Bring water, cranberries, and salt to a boil in medium saucepan over medium heat.
2. Add oats; cook over medium-low heat, stirring frequently, for 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
3. Add cardamom; mix well. Let oatmeal stand 1 minute before serving.
4. Divide evenly between two serving bowls; top each evenly with honey (if desired) and milk.

Nutrition Info (per Serving):
Calories: 104
Fat: 2 g
Carbohydrates: 19 g (Fiber: 3 g; Sugars: 4 g)
Protein: 3 g

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7 Ways to Avoid Eating Leftover Halloween Candy

Let’s be honest: We all say Halloween candy is for kids, but it’s hard not to reach for a piece — or seven — once it’s in your house. While I can’t come to your house and physically prevent you from housing the whole bag at once, I can offer you some tried-and-true tips to keep your candy binge in check.

How to Avoid Eating Leftover Halloween Candy

7 Ways to Avoid Eating leftover Halloween Candy

1. Hold Off On Buying Candy

Buy candy for trick-or-treaters as close to Halloween night as you can. Less temptation leading up to Halloween, and you are less likely to make a run to go buy more.

2. Buy Less Candy, Give Out More

Buy less than you think you will need. This will help you avoid having leftovers hanging around the house. It’s better for you to run out of treats than to be left eating them yourself. If you find that your Halloween candy bowl is still full as the night goes on, start handing out more candy to each costumed kiddo that rings your doorbell. They’ll be thrilled, and you’ll be saved.

3. Buy the Stuff You Like the Least

One simple way to prevent yourself from eating leftover candy is to buy stuff you don’t like, whether that’s candy corn, atomic fireballs, or Good & Plenty. Buying what you don’t like will make you less likely to indulge and reduce the urge you have to sample treats as you hand them out on Halloween.

It’s not that I want to be cruel to others by feeding them waxy candy corn. Some kids love it. I just know I won’t eat a single piece.

4. Eat Well

Sugar cravings can strike when you’re hungry and haven’t consumed enough fuel to keep your blood sugar in balance. Eat protein and fiber-rich meals in the days before and after Halloween. It’ll make you feel less tempted to create a dinner out of mini candy bars.

5. Savor a Single Treat

Mindless eating is a good way to eat way more than you mean to — whether that’s nuts, chips, or candy. Rather than sitting in from of your TV munching your way through a bag of chocolate, try mindful eating.

Select the one piece of candy that you most want to eat. Tune out all other distractions and focus on savoring the experience of eating it. Chew slowly, let it melt in your mouth, enjoy the sweetness, and notice how it makes you feel. Cutting that piece of candy into smaller pieces will make the experience last longer, and according to research may even make you feel like you’re eating more. Make your piece of candy go even further by chopping it into tiny pieces and sprinkling the bits on top of plain Greek yogurt.

6. Keep Your Mouth Minty Fresh

When you get the urge to unwrap handfuls of Halloween loot, give your pearly whites a quick brushing and see if that curbs it. Brushing your teeth can be a successful deterrent  — especially the chewy, sticky stuff like caramels and gummy bears.

7. Just Chuck It

This will likely put you in the running for Worst Parent Ever, but ask your kids to choose their favorite treats and then donate or throw away the rest. The longer treats stay in the house uneaten, the more likely you are to give in to temptation.

6 Healthy Halloween Treats

Candy corn, chocolate bars, caramel apples, and so many other sugary treats are front-and-center at Halloween, even before the trick-or-treating begins! If you want to get into the holiday spirit in a healthier way, here are some easy-to-make Halloween snacks we found that kids (and kids at heart) will love!

Healthy Halloween Treats

6 Healthy Halloween Treats

Jack-o’-Lantern Fruit Cups

Add color and fun to your Halloween with these smiling jack-o’-lantern faces carved into navel oranges. Slice off the tops of the oranges, scoop out the pulp, use a paring knife to cut out jack-o’-lantern faces, and fill with grapes and/or mixed berries.

Healthy Halloween Treats - Jack-o’-Lantern Fruit Cups

 

Slithering Snake Dip

Eek! What is lurking in your hummus? A slithering snake made from black olives! Just carve beady eyes from string cheese and add a carrot tongue. Even those who hate serpents will love this little guy.

Healthy Halloween Treats - Kids Hummus Dip

 

Mummified Apples

Googly eyes and gauze tape turn green apples into mummies that are almost too cute to bite into.

Healthy Halloween Treats - Kids Mummified Apples

Monster Pie

Kids will love this Monsters, Inc. tart because it’s so darn cute, and well, because it’s dessert! Visit Creative and Healthy Fun Food to get this recipe that’s got a filling made from avocado, banana, and almond milk!

Healthy Halloween Treats - Monster Fruit Pie

Spooky Spider Eggs

Deviled eggs (like these) get extra creepy-crawly when they’re topped with spiders. To make eight scary spider eggs, cut 12 black olives in half vertically. Place one half in the center of each egg to form the body, then slice each remaining olive half into four sections to create legs. Shiver.

Healthy Halloween Treats - Spider Deviled Eggs

Eyeball Pasta

Start off a night of trick-or-treating with this clever eyeball pasta! Visit Spend with Pennies to see how she used string cheese, black olives, and a straw to create eyeballs of different sizes that stare out of ghoulishly green spinach pasta.

Healthy Halloween Treats - Eyeball Party Pasta

Candy Corn Protein Shake

Whether you love it or run screaming from it, candy corn is symbolic of Halloween. But, there are plenty of healthier ways to celebrate this spooky holiday than loading up on candy. This year, how about whipping up a festive Candy Corn Protein Smoothie instead? It’s like a costume for your smoothie! The three layers get their colors from wholesome ingredients such as carrot juice, pineapple, and turmeric, which taste surprisingly good when mixed with Vanilla Shakeology (or sub your favorite protein powder) and coconut milk.

Candy Corn Halloween Protein Shake Recipe

The novelty of this multi-layered shake does require a bit of extra effort and freezer time. If Halloween is your favorite holiday, then you’ll agree that every step is worth it. If you want to skip straight to the enjoyment part, you can blend all of the ingredients together at once.

Candy Corn Protein Shake Recipe

Total Time: 45 min.
Prep Time: 15 min.
Cooking Time: None
Yield: 1 smoothie

Ingredients:
For Bottom Layer:
½ cup fresh carrot juice
¼ cup reduced fat (2%) plain Greek yogurt
½ cup ice

For Middle Layer:
½ cup water
½ cup ice
½ scoop Vanilla Shakeology (or protein powder)
¼ cup canned pineapple, in juice, drained
½ tsp. ground turmeric

For Top Layer:
½ cup coconut milk beverage
½ cup ice
½ scoop Vanilla Shakeology (or protein powder)

Instructions:
For Bottom Layer:
1. Place carrot juice, yogurt, and ice in blender; cover. Blend until smooth.
2. Pour into large serving glass. Place glass in freezer for 15 minutes.

For Middle Layer:
1. Place water, ice, Shakeology, pineapple, and turmeric in blender; cover. Blend until smooth.
2. Slowly pour into serving glass over bottom layer. Place glass in freezer for 15 minutes.

For Top Layer:
1. Place coconut milk, ice, and Shakeology in blender; cover. Blend until smooth.
2. Slowly pour into serving glass over middle layer; serve immediately.

Nutritional Information (per serving):
Calories: 255
Total Fat: 5 g
Total Carbohydrates: 29 g (Fiber: 4 g; Sugars: 20 g)
Protein: 23 g

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Hummus Deviled Eggs

For a protein-packed snack, try these hummus-filled eggs topped with Kalamata olives and smoked paprika. The combination of flavors is more exciting than your average deviled egg. And, each serving is extremely satisfying pieces!

Hummus Deviled Eggs Recipe

Hummus Deviled Eggs Recipe

Total Time: 10 min.
Prep Time: 10 min.
Cooking Time: None
Yield: 2 servings, 8 egg halves each

Ingredients:
8 hard-boiled eggs, cut in half lengthwise, yolks discarded
½ cup prepared hummus (or try this homemade version!)
10 Kalamata olives, chopped
Ground smoked paprika (to taste; optional)

Preparation:
1. Fill each egg white half with 1½ tsp. hummus.
2. Sprinkle evenly with olives and paprika. Serve immediately.

Nutritional Information (per serving):
Calories: 223
Fat: 10 g
Carbohydrates: 14 g (Fiber: 3 g; Sugars: 1 g)
Protein: 17 g

 

Homemade Hummus

omemade hummus is great because you can reduce the amount of olive oil and tahini, making it lower in fat and calories. Try this with veggies for a snack or in this deviled egg recipe for a healthy appetizer!

Healthy Homemade Hummus Recipe

Healthy Homemade Hummus Recipe

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 10 servings, about ¼ cup each

Ingredients:

  • 1 (15 oz.) can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), reserve liquid
  • ¼ cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp . extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic , coarsely chopped
  • ¼ cup tahini (sesame butter)
  • Sea salt (or Himalayan salt) (to taste; optional)
  • Ground paprika (for garnish; optional)

Instructions:

  1. Place chickpeas, lemon juice, oil, and garlic in food processor or blender and pulse until chickpeas are mashed.
  2. Add tahini; pulse for 1 minute. If hummus is too thick, add some of the reserved chickpea liquid. Add salt, if desired.
  3. Garnish with paprika, if desired.

Nutritional Information (per serving):
Calories: 93
Fat: 5 g
Carbohydrates: 9 g (Fiber: 3 g; Sugars: 1 g)
Protein: 3 g